6 Strategies for Creating a Positive Classroom Culture

When you walk into a classroom, often the first thing you notice is the “feel” of the room. That is the classroom culture.

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Teachers know that creating a positive classroom culture is vital to having a safe space for students to learn.

Students need a classroom where:

  • they feel safe to express their ideas.
  • they know it is okay to make mistakes.
  • they are invited to ask questions.
  • they are able to take ownership of the culture and their learning.
  • they know their teacher and classmates care about them.

AKA… a positive classroom culture.

Teachers also know that a positive classroom culture does not always occur naturally. We have to make intentional decisions about how to create a positive learning environment for students.

Here are 6 strategies for creating a positive classroom culture:

1. Greet Students at the Door

Greeting students at the door every day is key to welcoming them to a safe learning environment and positive classroom culture. Whether you greet them with a handshake, smile, or friendly “hello” you should use their name–reminding them they are an important part of the class. When your students enter your classroom they should know that you are glad to see them.

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2. Create a Social Contract (with students)

Instead of handing students a list of classroom rules, invite them to join in the conversation about how to make the classroom a positive place for learning to occur. This can be done in many ways depending on what you think will best work for your students. You could start the conversation by defining respect. (What does it mean to be respected by a teacher? To respect our peers? To respect our teacher?) Have students discuss examples and non-examples of behaviors in a safe or positive classroom environment.

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3. Have Procedures

Procedures are different than rules. Procedures should be information for students about how to do things in order to succeed in the environment. These are things like how restroom passes work, where they can find materials, what they should do if they are absent, etc. Having a system in place for these day-to-day events gives students a sense of security because they already know what to do in those situations when they come up. It is also good to practice and review these procedures throughout the year. Note: When a procedure is not followed, it is important to address it without getting angry… adults make mistakes and so do students.

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4. Share “Good News” Every Day

Take the first 2-3 minutes of class to ask students to share some good news. This is something that can start every class period on a positive note. Asking for students to share good news from their academic or personal life sets the stage for positive interaction and lets you learn about your students’ lives. It is a good idea to begin by first sharing good news in your life and showing that this can be something small (you had an awesome coffee for breakfast) or something big (you won an award).
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5. Model Positive Behavior

In order to keep the positive classroom culture going throughout the year, it is important to continue to model positive behavior for your students. Let them see you have positive interactions, conversations, and relationships with students and your colleagues. Use positive and caring tones in your voice when you are talking to your class. Hold yourself accountable in the same way you expect your students to hold themselves accountable. Don’t be afraid to admit when you make a mistake and be sure to apologize when needed.

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6. Make Every Day a New Day

Bad days will happen. They will happen with a class or an individual student. The worst thing you can do is carry your frustration over to the next day. Address the issue (with the class or student) and then remind them that every day is a new day. Learn from it and start on a positive note the following day.

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Creating a positive classroom culture is the first step to setting up a quality learning environment for your students. Discover what works for you!

Read more about creating a positive classroom culture: 

Keep the conversation going…

  • How do you create a positive culture in your room?
  • What strategies have worked or not worked?
  • What advice do you have for new teachers on establishing a positive classroom culture?

P.S. If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment below or sharing it on Facebook or Twitter!

 

Keeping the Conversation Going: The Learning in Teaching Blog

Where I have been…glasses-272399__340

I can’t believe it has been nearly two years since I’ve written about beginning the journey
of graduate work through Morningside College. It has truly been a challenging and rewarding experience.

The work I have done in my master’s program has provided me with skills that have proven to be invaluable in my teaching career. By learning more about collaboration and leadership, I have been able to transform my role as a teacher-leader in my building and district. 

This program has taught me to be a more reflective, purposeful, and focused teacher. It has helped me to encompass the growth mindset both when considering my students as learners and myself as an educator. I am able to model for my students the mindset that I wish them to approach learning with. With this mindset, comes the insatiable hunger to learn more and continue to improve as a teacher.

While I expected to learn an extensive amount about myself as a teacher and a learner, I was surprised to find that my master’s program taught me a lot about myself as a person. My confidence and self-worth have been highly impacted by the work I have done in this program. While the idea of a growth mindset has carried into the lessons I teach my students, it has so strongly centered itself in the way I live my life. As my study in this program is coming to a close, for the first time in my life I have found myself thinking: What else am I capable of?

Where I am going… Where WE are going…

The work from my master’s program has instilled in my mind so many ideas, concerns,
and questions about education. While I have to admit I am looking forward to a little more free time, I do not want the conversations about education to end! The most powerful learning occurred for me when communicating and collaborating with my classmates …which brings me to the Learning in Teaching blog.

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My hope for this blog is that it will keep the conversation going. I want this blog to create more of these conversations through my ideas, concerns, and questions to an audience of brilliant people and educators that have ideas, concerns and questions of their own. We are all in this together and in a time where collaboration and communication are vital… we must make that happen. The power of collaborative educators is a force to be reckoned with… let the voices be heard!

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